Self Love & Sweat The Podcast

7 Summits, 7 Kids, 7 Lessons with Jenn Drummond

September 01, 2023 Lunden Souza Season 1 Episode 140
7 Summits, 7 Kids, 7 Lessons with Jenn Drummond
Self Love & Sweat The Podcast
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Self Love & Sweat The Podcast
7 Summits, 7 Kids, 7 Lessons with Jenn Drummond
Sep 01, 2023 Season 1 Episode 140
Lunden Souza

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Today's guest, Jenn Drummond, is a Mom of 7, successful business owner and Guinness World Record holder. As the first woman to climb the second highest summits on each of the 7 continents, she now spends her time inspiring others to create a thriving business and lasting legacy of their own. What does life look like for Jenn? What does training look like? What does nutrition look like? How does she have time for her kids and family? Learn all this and more....

Timestamps to help you navigate this episode:
(0:00) Intro
(0:20) FREE Self Love & Sweat MONTHLY Calendar
(6:48) Self-discovery and Mindset Shift
(15:25) Motivation, Parenthood, and Pursuit
(20:39) Sponsor: Magic Mind Energy Shots 20% OFF using code LUNDEN20
(22:33) Balancing Training with Motherhood and Work
(28:10) The Concept of the Magnificent Mom
(36:23) Leaving a Lasting Legacy

Learn More About Jen's Book and Podcast Here:
https://jenndrummond.com/podcast/
https://jenndrummond.com/book/

Connect with Jen:
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thejenndrummond/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jenn-drummond/
Website: https://www.jenndrummond.com/

Support the Show.

2 FREE HIGH INTENSITY RESISTANCE TRAINING WORKOUTS: https://lifelikelunden.activehosted.com/f/169

FREE Self Love & Sweat Monthly Life Coaching Calendar: http://lifelikelunden.com/calendar

One-On-One Life Coaching & NLP with Lunden:
http://lifelikelunden.com/vip

Connect with Lunden:
IG: @lifelikelunden
YouTube: https://youtube.com/lundensouza
LinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lundensouza/
Twitter: @lifelikelunden

Use code LUNDEN25 for 25% off Snap Supplements: https://bit.ly/snapsweat

Use code LUNDEN25 for$25 off at Evolve Telemed: https://evolvetelemed.com

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Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Text us your feedback on this episode

Today's guest, Jenn Drummond, is a Mom of 7, successful business owner and Guinness World Record holder. As the first woman to climb the second highest summits on each of the 7 continents, she now spends her time inspiring others to create a thriving business and lasting legacy of their own. What does life look like for Jenn? What does training look like? What does nutrition look like? How does she have time for her kids and family? Learn all this and more....

Timestamps to help you navigate this episode:
(0:00) Intro
(0:20) FREE Self Love & Sweat MONTHLY Calendar
(6:48) Self-discovery and Mindset Shift
(15:25) Motivation, Parenthood, and Pursuit
(20:39) Sponsor: Magic Mind Energy Shots 20% OFF using code LUNDEN20
(22:33) Balancing Training with Motherhood and Work
(28:10) The Concept of the Magnificent Mom
(36:23) Leaving a Lasting Legacy

Learn More About Jen's Book and Podcast Here:
https://jenndrummond.com/podcast/
https://jenndrummond.com/book/

Connect with Jen:
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thejenndrummond/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jenn-drummond/
Website: https://www.jenndrummond.com/

Support the Show.

2 FREE HIGH INTENSITY RESISTANCE TRAINING WORKOUTS: https://lifelikelunden.activehosted.com/f/169

FREE Self Love & Sweat Monthly Life Coaching Calendar: http://lifelikelunden.com/calendar

One-On-One Life Coaching & NLP with Lunden:
http://lifelikelunden.com/vip

Connect with Lunden:
IG: @lifelikelunden
YouTube: https://youtube.com/lundensouza
LinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lundensouza/
Twitter: @lifelikelunden

Use code LUNDEN25 for 25% off Snap Supplements: https://bit.ly/snapsweat

Use code LUNDEN25 for$25 off at Evolve Telemed: https://evolvetelemed.com

Lunden Souza:

Welcome to Self Love and Sweat: THE PODCAST the place where you'll get inspired to live your life unapologetically, embrace your perfect imperfections, break down barriers and do what sets your soul on fire. I'm your host, Lunden Souza. Hey, have you grabbed y our free Self Love and Sweat monthly calendar yet? This calendar is so amazing. It comes right in your inbox every single month to help you have a little nugget of wisdom, a sweaty workout, a mindset activity, just a little something, something to help keep you focused and motivated and keep that momentum towards your goals. So every day, when you get this calendar, you'll see a link that you can click that will lead to a podcast episode or a workout or something that will be very powerful and quick to read. And then you'll also see, on the top left corner of every single day, there's a little check box in the calendar and what that is is that's for your one thing. You can choose one thing every month, or it can be the same, something that you want to implement and make this something that you can easily implement, like daily meditation or getting a certain amount of steps or water, for example, and staying hydrated and even taking your supplements. This can be something if you want to get more regular doing a particular habit and routine, you can choose what that checkbox means. So if you want your self, love and sweat free monthly calendar delivered right to your inbox every month on the first of the month, go to lifelikelunden. com/calendar , fill out the form really quickly and you will have your calendar in your inbox within a few short minutes. That's lifelikelunden L I F E L I K E L U N D E N dot com forward slash calendar. Go get yours for free and enjoy this episode.

Lunden Souza:

Welcome back to the podcast. Today we have Jen Drummond. Jen is a mom of seven, a successful business owner and Guinness World Record holder as the first woman to climb the second highest summits on each of the seven continents. She now spends her time inspiring others to create a thriving business and lasting legacy of their own. She shares her story and strategies for success through her book quit proof seven strategies for life goals and business success, and her seek your next summit, podcast programs and signature talks. I'm so excited to have you on the show today, Jen. Do you have seven strategies for life goals because you have seven kids, or is it just like seven?

Jen Drummond:

Everything is just seven. Yeah, so everything's a seven in my life. So my world record was set from climbing seven mountains and seven continents. I have seven kids, so I'm like we're going to turn this into seven strategies, and seven is my thing, it's a affinity for it.

Lunden Souza:

Oh my gosh. So when did you decide that you wanted to? Did you always want to do a Guinness World Record? Was that on your dream? Was that on your radar? Like, how did this come about?

Jen Drummond:

Yeah, okay. So what version of the story do you want? Do you want a two minute or five minute? Or I want the truth, wait, okay, okay, the truth minute. So I would, let's like, back up.

Jen Drummond:

I was in a horrific car accident in 2018. Should have taken my life and didn't. A few weeks after that accident, a friend of mine was running on a trail. It was wet out, slipped, hit a rock, died instantly, never came home, and so I was on this quest of like. Why was I saved? Why wasn't she? What's the purpose? Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah.

Jen Drummond:

2020 was about a year away and I was turning 40 and 2020 to age myself, and I was like I'm alive, I'm going to live, I'm going to climb a cool mountain to launch off this next decade. So I was training for a mountain called Ama Dablam and everybody, it's the mountain that is the logo for Paramount Pictures. So everybody's like, yeah, that's the best mountain. It's in Nepal, it's gorgeous, it's all the things. So, I'm training for Alma Dablam. And, as we all know, covid hits, strikes us, and we all become homeschool teachers that are parents, or we get stuck in our houses, depending on wherever we are in life, and I have seven children. So I am homeschooling at a whole different level. My son struggling with his math homework, like listen, buddy, we do hard things, you've got this. And he looks at me and goes if we do hard things, why are you climbing a mountain called I'm a dumb blonde, instead of a real mountain like Mount Everest? And I like Ama Dablam honey, not I'm a dumb blonde, who are you telling this to? And so I said you know what? Finish your math homework, we'll look at Everest. So we were looking at Everest and by the end of the week I'm like I hired a coach. I'm training for Alma Dablam and Everest.

Jen Drummond:

The coach gives me a book to read. He's like I want you to read this book. It's about training as all these different things in it. So the book comes in and in the front of the book there was a forward about a lady who got a Guinness world record for skiing across the Alps in like Europe. And I remember thinking I could have done that. Like my kids learned how to read on Guinness world record books. Like if I got a Guinness world record, they would think I'm the coolest mom ever. And right now I'm not feeling like a coolest mom ever, because I'm harassing them about getting all this work done. That is not really normally my job.

Jen Drummond:

So I'm talking to my coach and he's like, yeah, I'll find you one, I'll find you one. So okay, but listen, I'm not growing pumpkins and I'm not speeding in hot dogs, so whatever. And we're kind of joking about it, so I let it go. But then a couple weeks later he calls me out of the blue and he's like Jen, Jen, Jen. Like yeah, it's like I have the perfect world record for you. Like, oh, yeah, okay, what is it? He goes I think you should climb the seven second summits. So they've never been done by a female before. They're harder than the first seven. Seven continents, seven mountains, seven kids sounds like a jackpot. And so I said let's try it. I've never slept in a tent overnight more than one night in a row before, but we'll see what happens. And that's how that whole quest started.

Lunden Souza:

Oh my gosh, you're wonderful. Seven kids homeschooling during COVID and then also deciding to train for seven summits that's not something that most people I think their brain can fully like comprehend that somebody else can do, let alone their own self. What type of self-confidence do you believe you were born with? Or like the, I can do it? Do you think it was the near death experience? Did you have that before? Or did it just like click?

Jen Drummond:

You know. Here's what happened. In the car accident experience I realized with my friend dying a few weeks later, we don't get to choose when we leave, but we sure get to choose how we live. And so the one thing that I have control over is how I'm living. And before the and the accident was aligned in the sand.

Jen Drummond:

Before the accident, I was living a life of maybe more shoulds Okay, I'm going to get these kids launched and then I'll come back to me, or I'm going to do this and I'm going to come back to me. And then, when I almost died and I looked at what my life resume would say, I was thinking man, there's a lot more I could put on that Like. I have a lot more to offer this world than being a mother to my children. Now, I'm grateful for being a mother to my children, but that's only one piece of me. There's a lot of me that I would like to experience and explore and see what it shows up. And so when the seven second summit quest came about, I thought to myself even if I failed, it's still a pretty cool pursuit. No one's done it before. The first female, like all those things, gave me permission to try something that was so far out of my realm that I knew no matter what showed up. It would be a pretty cool experience.

Lunden Souza:

And you weren't afraid of that failure. I think sometimes thinking about that failure can be crippling for some people, or the outcome and the end of like either I did it or I didn't. And it seems like you were enjoying that pursuit and saw failure as not such a big deal or not such a like. How do you view failure? And yeah, what about it? Have you failed? Did you fail any of them?

Jen Drummond:

Oh, yeah, yes, yes, yes. Are you kidding me? I fail every day. But here's the thing I think a lot of people put failure on the opposite side of the spectrum from success, and I view failure in the pursuit of success, that you have to have failure to have success. And here's an interesting take from the mountains I had no idea when you climbed Mount Everest that you don't just start at base camp and work your way up to the top.

Jen Drummond:

You actually have to acclimatize, which means you climb up to the mountain top and to a point of failure where your body is like do you cannot take another step? There's not enough oxygen, we can't operate here. This is horrible. And so then, once you hit that point which is for the first time, maybe camp one or camp two then you go back down to base camp and you go back down to base camp and you allow your body to acclimate and what actually happens is your body physiologically changes and it starts to produce more red blood cells. So the next time you go to climb up Everest you can go higher because you have more red blood cells to operate in the lower oxygenated environment.

Jen Drummond:

So this is a lesson in. I had to go to failure to be able to come back and go further the next time. When we lift weights, there's some strategies that you go to failure so that you come back stronger and you can lift a heavier weight next time. So once you start framing failure in the pursuit of success, it gives you permission to have failure and then use that knowledge in whatever has changed to carry you forth and make your goals a reality.

Lunden Souza:

Yeah, yeah. And that fitness reference really resonates because that's where I started. My career was in fitness and I would use that analogy a lot of like we have to get to that failure point because that's how you like push the envelope you get out just a little bit and you end up stronger because of it. How have your past failures shaped your approach to risk taking and decision making in the future? Were there points when you got to failure, where you're like I cannot do this, or did you always face failure and think, no, I'm going to move through that?

Jen Drummond:

So lucky for me, the mountains had all been summited before. So in my mind, if I had seen somebody else summit it, then I know it's available to me, because somebody else did it. Maybe it wasn't a woman, maybe it wasn't whatever but that is like if a human has done it, it's available to me. I just have to figure out what I need to do to make that happen, and then you have to define what failure means to you. So, for example, I have a story that I tell in a speech that I give. That's called people over peaks, and when I went to climb K2 the first time I didn't summit, and so that, on that level, is a failure. But the reason why I didn't summit is because I was up on the mountain about a day from when I would summit and I got a call on the radio and I was informed that one of my teammates passed away in an avalanche, another was injured and another one was stuck on the mountain. Until it was safer to rescue this human, I turned around to go be with my team.

Jen Drummond:

I didn't want to summit and have it always have the darkness of all the terrible things that happened on that expedition. I wanted the mountains always going to be there. The team that I was with and the relationships that I built were way more important than the summit, so I had to go back to K2 and try it a second time, and when I went back the second time, I was like, okay, what did I learn this first time that I didn't know the second time? And I had found out that there had not been a Pakistani female on the top of her country's prized peak, and so then I got to sponsor a Pakistani female, and so when I climbed K2 in 2022 and summited, it was amazing.

Jen Drummond:

But when I saw this woman that I helped make possible for her journey up that mountain summit, I was waterworks, because now all of her people have an example of a woman that looks like them on the top of that mountain. And that's where is that failure? Like it was a success, and I wouldn't have been a success if I didn't have the failure the first year. And so I think a lot of it is. When we're looking at failure in such a small little envelope, we're not looking far enough down the road to see how that failure is actually a story of success. You just haven't lived through the whole line of it.

Lunden Souza:

Yeah, it's like I either did or I didn't. Right now, but not being able to see that picture and looking at what you were able to yeah, bring somebody else to be the first, and other people just like you. You saw another human. Maybe somebody else is gonna see her and be like oh, she did it, so I can too. Are you afraid to die?

Jen Drummond:

I'm afraid to die prematurely, yeah. I just yeah, I think once you've been in a I mean I've had a couple near-death experiences and once you've been in those situations or you've had people die and fluke, accidents or weird things, you just really become we're all gonna die. So why would I focus on dying? Why wouldn't I focus on living? And because I can control what I do each day, or what I'm interested in or how I spend my time, and so that's where I'm gonna focus and put my energy.

Lunden Souza:

Yeah, and I ask because I'm pretty motivated by death. I just feel like you know we're gonna get there and I don't want to be in a position where, like you said, I should have done this or whatever. Like I often think about when I need that motivation or that spark or that oomph, you know, on those hard days like, okay, well, when you get to your deathbed, what are people gonna say about that? What are you gonna say? How are you gonna feel?

Lunden Souza:

And I, there was like two instances recently where I was in a car on a way to a hike, writing with a friend of mine and a song came on and I go, oh, that's my funeral song, because that's the song I want to play at my funeral. And then I was sitting on the couch with a friend the other day and we were watching a movie and it was like in a cemetery and I was like, oh, I wanna be buried in one of those pods where you're a tree and you're like the bottom of it. You know how do you wanna be buried? And in both situations they were both like perturbed by the fact that I had a funeral song and I knew exactly how I wanted to be buried.

Lunden Souza:

But I don't find it morbid, I find it more motivating to think about that and to have those conversations. But it was just interesting because, yeah, when you kind of brought it up and your near-death experience, and then you're doing these summits and people you know are being, you know, killed in avalanches or other things, and then when I had those conversations, those two instances where people are like you have a funeral song, you know, I never thought about it before. I think about it a lot but I'm not afraid of it and we're motivated by it. Is that how you feel or what do you think about that?

Jen Drummond:

Well, I have a funeral song. So I think you're the only other person I've ever met that's like I have a funeral song. So I totally get it. No, I use death as a motivation. I use deadlines as a motivation. I mean, I feel like it's the same concept. It just when I know I'm going on an expedition and I'm gonna be away from my kids for a little bit, I'm extremely intentional with my time before I go to make sure that I get one-on-one time with each one of them, we're spending and we're connecting and with that intention, knowing that this deadline's coming, I feel my life is way more aligned time-wise with my values and how I want it to spend than it would be otherwise.

Lunden Souza:

Yeah, yeah. And with seven kids, do all of them react differently to what you're doing? Do any of them have some fears? Like how do you I don't know how old your kids are, but like how do you meet them where they are in their brains and their mentality, plus you're their mom. Like how do you? Yeah, how does that work? What does that look like?

Jen Drummond:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. So when I went to go do Everest, it was gonna be the longest time I'd ever been away from home, so I was worried about him. I went to the school and I talked to the school and I said, hey, listen, I'm gonna be gone, here's what I'm doing. Can you just offer a little bit more grace to my kids during this timeframe?

Jen Drummond:

And the school came up with an amazing idea. They said, listen, let's do an Everest campaign. Let's have all the kids write what their goal is on a hiker in the hallway. We'll track you while you're climbing Everest and we'll just make this a whole big event. And so then, when I was gone, kids would say, hey, your mom made it to camp two, or here's what your mom's doing, or it was this huge community following what my pursuit was. So my kids felt so loved and thought it was so cool that their mom was gonna be the mom that was on top of Everest. And when I got back, some of the kids would come over after school and ask all about the trip and they wanted to climb Everest someday. And I'm like, hey, I'm here for all of it, so let me know when that happens. So I feel really blessed.

Lunden Souza:

Yeah, and what have they learned? Like, have you noticed their growth through your pursuit? Like I can't, like I'm sure they're just like, like my mom, you know, did all that. I'm sure there's some pride. Yeah, like, what does a young mind gain from seeing you?

Jen Drummond:

summit. Yeah Well, it's funny. So somebody one of my kids was complaining about something and how it was hard and blah, blah, blah, blah. And they're like we're not allowed to complain. Our mom climbed Everest, which means we can climb it too, so we just have to push through. So, right Like, and I think your kids see you doing life and they realize, guess what? I don't necessarily want to train today, or I don't want to eat healthy today, or I want to do some of these things that are hard towards my pursuit, but the pursuit is worth it. So sometimes I have to sacrifice the short term happiness for my longterm happiness, and they see it. They see it in me. So we're living life in parallel and that, I think, helps both of us. When I want to quit, I'm like I can't quit. My kids are watching. I need to demonstrate how we push through when things get hard.

Lunden Souza:

I love that and being the example. Instead of saying like you do this or take care of this or you should be this, you're actually embodying that. Oh, that's so wonderful. How old are your kids Like? What's the age range?

Jen Drummond:

Yeah, yeah yeah, so my oldest is 16 and my youngest are 10. So I have I have five boys and then a set of twins at the bottom, and I should say like there was a point where one of my twin daughters was nervous about what was going on. So then I ended up taking her and a couple of the other kids climbing and did the activity that I do on the mountains just at a bigger scale so that they could feel it. I said, see, even when I'm scared, I'm on the mountain, I'm still on a rope, I'm still tied in, I still have different like safety devices to make sure I'm safe. And so then that took that concern out of her brain, because she got to feel it and see it and actually do it, not just conceptually understand it. And I mean, that's our job as parents is to listen and then to help them connect the dots so they feel strong and encouraged.

Lunden Souza:

Yeah, like I hear you that fear is valid or the feeling she might be feeling are valid. Let me show you where I'm at so you can be there and touch and feel and experience with your senses. So then when she's imagining, hey, where's mom at the moment, she at least has some experience to pull from and be like okay, yeah, I did that. I can imagine that. I feel like that would be really, yeah, like a good, safe feeling for a kid to experience. Yeah, yeah, yeah. What does your training look like? What does your nutrition look like? I know that you mentioned, would you say, I'm not growing pumpkins and stuffing hot dogs or something like that. I remember talking with Dean Karnazes one time, which is this guy who runs like these ultra marathons all over, and he would have like a pizza delivered to him and like scarf it and then keep running. You know 25 miles. I know that what you're doing is not a, you know, easy feat. So what? What did your training look like? Your nutrition, and how important was that to to your success?

Lunden Souza:

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Lunden Souza:

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Jen Drummond:

Yeah. So my training because I'm a mom and work and do this training looks different than everybody else's and it's not ideal, but it's what works. So I will get up early, sometimes, do a training session, get the kids to school. Then I'll maybe train a little bit while they're at school I'll do other activities. If it's a busy day and someone has a soccer game, I'm the mom that's on the sideline of the soccer game watching the game, but maybe have a 12 inch step that I'm doing step ups on with a weighted backpack on. So at least I'm getting the training in while watching them playing soccer, instead of sitting on the sideline watching them play soccer.

Jen Drummond:

So I I've always had to, like, look at my week, really shift training around so that it fit into everybody else's schedule and then accommodate my kids. Sometimes I'd be like, mom, do you have to bring your stuff this time? I'm like, listen, I do have to bring my stuff this time. I'm sorry, but I am doing big things and big things require training and dedication and all the different pieces. Nutrition wise, I'm making sure that I'm eating healthy, because when you do heavy training loads, that's inflammation in your body. My body doesn't need additional inflammation from the things that I eat, so I'm trying to be conscientious of that. On my last expedition, when I went to Mount Logan, there was actually there's actually an amazing nutritionist who built custom meals for me, so they were all dehydrated and all I had to do is add water and I had spinach and green beans and like healthy things that you never get on the mountains and it was the best that ever felt.

Lunden Souza:

Yeah, that inflammation is real. And paying attention to the foods that we eat it's not just calories, I'm sure for you, where you're just like go, go, go, it's being mindful of those calories. When you say training, like what specifically are you doing? I have this wonderful visual of you on the sidelines at the soccer game with the backpack. My niece is five and she was playing soccer this season, so I just have this visual of a soccer game and you stepping up. Is it weights? Is it Pilates? Is it stretching? Is it yoga? Is it everything Like what? And, yeah, what does that look like?

Jen Drummond:

Yeah, so it's a little bit of everything, to be honest with you, because of my brain needs a variety to stay entertained. It's great, yes, but as much as hiking vertical that I can do, the better off I am, because that's actually how I'm going to actually operate in the mountains. So I try to have my training mimic what my actual experience will be as much as possible. But when it comes to recovery or cross training, I'll do weights, I'll do Pilates, I'll do yoga, I'll do stretching sessions and all of it. I'll do breath work. I think breath work is big on it.

Lunden Souza:

Same. I love breath work. What is your breath work practice look like? Is it daily, is it multiple times a day? What specific breath work techniques do you? I'm just curious, because I love it so much.

Jen Drummond:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, no. So I do some Zoom online ones actually because I just like the energy of the group and the accountability, and then I'll do for me. Every time I hit a red light I'll make sure that I try to do as slow a breathing as possible at the red lights, just to help calm my nervous system down and that's a trigger to remind me or to check in with my breath. Am I breathing short? Am I like am I giving all that anxiety up or can I calm my system down a little bit more than what I'm doing? So I use the trigger meditation of a red light to start breathing slower, but otherwise I'll probably do breath work once or twice a day because it just grounds me so much.

Lunden Souza:

Yeah, and then when I'm sounding, it probably helps with your lung capacity and things like that. I like that the red light to have that be a trigger to remind you to breathe slower. For me I have like a bathroom trigger. Like every time I go and sit down and just am in the bathroom I just say to myself thank you for allowing me to utilize my strengths and strengthen my weaknesses.

Lunden Souza:

I just like it started when I was living in Austria and had a pretty intense job, working a lot of hours, a lot of roles, and it would be like my sanctuary. I would just go in there and kind of repeat that Do you have any others besides the red light or things? I love doing that with my clients too. It's like okay, what are you already doing? Right, when you're driving, I guess hopefully you hit that green wave, but most of the time you're begun to hit a red light, and those are moments where we can just kind of like stack it together, where it's like red light means breathe slower. Are there any other trigger habits that you have implemented that you're like that totally works for me.

Jen Drummond:

Yeah, so I have. You know how we have alarms on our phones. I've labeled my alarms. So I'll have an alarm go off in the afternoon at 3pm every day when the kids are in school and it says magnificent mom. And when that alarm goes off it reminds me to step into the avatar of magnificent mom, and so then if I'm doing things that a magnificent mom wouldn't be doing per my definition, it helps me, like just check in and shut that world down and step into this world that I need to do for the next few hours, because this is the time my kids need me. So I really find setting alarms or if I'm going to work out, I actually set a bedtime I'm less worried about my morning routine, I'm more worried about my night routine. So at 10 o'clock it says serious sleeper, and it's alarm that goes off to remind me like, stop scrolling, stop doing. Whatever you're doing it's a bad, because anything after this is borrowing the next day and I don't want to take debt from my next day.

Lunden Souza:

Yeah, I love that. And the power of our phones right the alarms. We're already connected to it all the time. What is the avatar of Magnificent Mom? What is that for you? What is she doing? What does she do? What are you doing?

Jen Drummond:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. So she's patient. I think it's the number one thing she's alluding love. So anytime my kids come home from school, it can be a little hectic because there's so much energy that they have to dissipate from just the day and I remind myself that this is the meditation. Like when my kids trigger me or there's things going on, I don't need to be in a meditative state to do meditation. The meditation is living life every day. So when I see them struggling or whatever the meditation is, how do I alleviate that? Or how do I help them recognize? Like, oh wow, your body seems to be telling me that it's having a hard time calming down right now. Do you want to go? What do you think would help? You want to go take a walk? Do you want a glass of water? Do you want to sit up and get up and then come back to this project or whatever else? But it's very much going into an awareness state, a loving state and a state of patience.

Lunden Souza:

Awareness, loving and patient. Yeah, that sounds magnificent. That's cool that you know that and I think it's important that we do know that and we know whether it's a magnificent mom or whatever it might be to know, like, what specifically am I doing when I'm being that? Because it's one thing to say, okay, I want to be this or I want to be that, and we can get so, like you know, chunked up in the idea, but it's so important to be like, okay, what specifically does that look like and how do I need to yeah, like you said, maybe switch off one mode and switch into another. Does the alarm always work for you, like where you're like magnet and you're able to make that switch? Do you feel like you're it's in your programming enough where it comes on? I love this and I feel like it comes with practice too right Of, like honoring the alarm.

Jen Drummond:

right, yes, but everything's a practice and if I'm finishing something up, then I hit snooze, right. I don't like. There's a number of times that I can hit okay, turn it off or ready to go game over, next game, come on. But if there's a thing that I hey I'm finishing up this project, I'm allowed to hit snooze once. It gives me about nine more minutes or something like that, to finish what I'm doing and then transition over. And then, if I don't transition over, I'm not living the avatar that I said I would, and if I can't live the avatar that I said I would, then I start losing trust and confidence in who I am and that I can't compromise.

Lunden Souza:

Yeah, yeah, when we don't do what we said we're going to do, we lose the trust in our own selves and end up becoming kind of the I don't want to say our enemy, but just kind of our own biggest hindrance to what we said we're going to do. And yeah, that's really powerful. I want to talk about your book a little bit, the seven strategies for life goals and business success. We don't have to go through all seven, of course, because I want everyone to grab your book and read it, but what are maybe one or two of the strategies that you cover in that book that you could share with us today?

Jen Drummond:

Yeah.

Jen Drummond:

So I'd say one of the big ones is committing to the commitment.

Jen Drummond:

So you are the only person that has your experiences and your viewpoint and your calling, and so you have to be the strongest in that commitment because nobody else can be stronger than you. And so understanding that they're going to get their strength from your strength and I think that's a really big thing for people to step into. When I was on a mountain one year, we didn't summit and I had delegated some of the roles that I should have held on to myself so that everybody knew hey, here's what our goal is, here's how serious we are, here's how it's going to happen. And if you don't communicate that to everybody, then not everybody might be at the same commitment level you are and they're probably always going to be a level below you because it's not their record that they're trying to set. But you have to be so steadfast in your commitment that they can borrow courage and strength from you to help carry you forth in your goal. I think that's a big one, you know. The other big one is people over peaks, and I'll share a story from the book of when I went to go climb Everest. I had realized I was worried. I had never been on a mountain that big it's Everest. I had just not a ton of mountaineering experience when I stepped into the goal and I remember thinking, if my hair gets wet, it's going to take days for it to dry and I'm going to get sick. Okay, and I don't want to get sick.

Jen Drummond:

So I called a company. I said, hey, listen, I'm looking to climb Everest. I was wondering if I needed to bring a hairdryer to dry my hair, like could you accommodate? And the first company I called said we don't even know what you're talking about. Like absolutely no, like we're not doing this. I said, okay, fine, bye. And I called the second company and they said, yes, you can borrow the hairdryer. Like once a week We'll let you use the generator and that should be fine. I said okay. And then I called the third company and the third company said do you want a mirror? And I'm like, yes, I do want a mirror. Like thank you Right, like I don't even have to like feel shameful for what. I'm not asking for shrimp, I'm asking for a hairdryer so that I don't get sick and can like move up this mountain.

Jen Drummond:

So I actually had a company in town donate a solar powered battery, which at the time I thought I wasn't thinking. I was like, okay, I'll bring a solar powered battery and like dry my hair. And then I realized, oh, the solar powered battery has to be out in the sun. So now I have to like hair, dry my hair out in front of everybody and try to like, instead of being secret in my tent.

Jen Drummond:

And at first I was embarrassed, but then I realized after a few women came up to me and they said hey, jen, thank you for drying your hair and ever space camp and giving us permission to be women in this male dominated industry and not apologize for the things that we need. That will allow us to succeed in whatever pursuit we're doing. And that was this huge lesson of listen, ask for what you need. If it's an authentic need that you perceive, maybe it's somebody else's need as well, and by you having the courage to ask for it, you're giving other people permission to have courage to ask for what they need, and that's super important for all of us. And that was just a big lesson that I like run in my head all the time. The hair dryer story.

Lunden Souza:

Yeah, and it's a freaking hair dryer. And it's so cool to see that the hair dryer. I worked with a client once where there was a situation with a cat right and the cat made such a big difference and we were just like it's a freaking cat, you know it's a hair dryer, but knowing that, hey, we can ask for what we might need, we can, you know, stand firm and what we know is going to be helpful for us, and then other people can see it and that's like their you know their unofficial permission slip to be like, oh, I want a hair dryer too, and that's super, super cool. But the one thing I do know, just from talking with women and just working with women too, is that we oftentimes are, yeah, afraid to or don't say, hey, I need this. We're more like hey, what do you need?

Lunden Souza:

And others oriented with our kids and others and I know you're working with clients and stuff too. How do you help others be able to, like, ask for what they need? I mean, you asked three times and finally that third time was a charm you got the hair dryer, you got the mirror. Like what would be your advice for somebody listening who maybe struggles to ask for what they might need.

Jen Drummond:

Yeah, I mean, I would say for me it helped to have children, because I would always pretend if I was my daughter Jana or my daughter Julia. I would want them to have the courage to ask, and I would always pretend that I'm asking for the benefit of them, even though it's me who's asking. And so then, when you are struggling with asking for something that you want, think of somebody that you love or you care about, and you really hope that they have the courage to do it. You borrow that feeling of care and concern for them and you apply it to yourself, and then you ask, and you'd be amazed at how many times you receive.

Lunden Souza:

Yeah, you just put yourself in your child's shoes and ask us if you are them, because I think a lot of parents, yeah, and mothers listening can resonate with you, know the love and you know Adoration and everything for their kids to be like. Okay, if that was my kid, how would they ask and kind of embody their courage Just a little bit. That's wonderful. Um, in my, in your bio, I read To create a thriving business and lasting legacy of their own. And when it comes to that lasting legacy, I mean you're so eloquent with words. I know you're a speaker and have a podcast and all those things, but like what is that lasting legacy that you are leaving?

Jen Drummond:

right. So I'll give an example. I was climbing Mount Tyree in Antarctica. It had only been summited one time before by a female who was a guide. So I was the first American female second female ever, and I remember standing on the side of the mountain Thinking if I would have been born when my mom or my grandma were, they would have never been in the spot like this, like I'm so Grateful that I was born at the time that I was born and I had the courage to step into something that was crazy.

Jen Drummond:

And so I knew like I was carrying our flag up to the top of that mountain and that is just a sign like here's where we are now, everybody in the world. Here's the flag. Where are you going to take it next? Because everything we do impacts every generation, rippled wise, and so wherever you are in the world, whatever little corner that you can make a difference, the tiniest little thing Elevates all of us, and it's just so important to remember that the things we do are leaving legacy, either expanding what's possible or shrinking what's possible, and it's very important for us to tune into that because we're all connected.

Lunden Souza:

That's wonderful, yeah, to look back and think. I often think about that too. And my Mother and grandmother, and even my great grandmother, who I was fortunate enough to know and I think she passed away when I was like 14, 15. She came, yeah, from a different country, you know, didn't have any, didn't you know? And I'm thinking, if it wasn't for that move and I do look back at that lineage with so much Gratitude and, yeah, I have a picture of her framed and I just think about that a lot, where it's like, yeah, I like what you said about passing the flag. I didn't think of that before, but that visual really resonates and so, yeah, thank you for that.

Lunden Souza:

I so appreciate you and your time today and your lasting legacy that you're bringing to this world. I feel so like my whole, like I don't know if this happened before, but like I feel like I have like this, like goosebumps, electric energy like down my leg. So after we get off this, I'm gonna need to like jump around and go outside. I'm a little bit because I just feel, yeah, some type of way. So, thank you, that's a gift. Let everybody know how they can connect with you, how they can learn more about you. I'll, of course, list your books and podcasts and things in the description, but how can we get more from Jen Drummond?

Jen Drummond:

Yeah, yes, so please go to my website so it's J E N N Drummond, D R U M M O N D because that's kind of the home base and you can find whatever social channel you prefer or different things that are going on in my world over there I'd love to share.

Lunden Souza:

Perfect and thank you so much for your time. Thank you, guys for listening. Check out jendrummond. com. I'll put everything in the description. Pick up her book, stay connected and we'll see you at the next episode. Thank you, Jen. Hey, thank you, that was awesome. Thank you so much for listening to this episode of Self Love and Sweat: THE PODCAST. Hey, do me a favor wherever you're listening to this podcast, give us a review. This really helps a lot and share this with a friend. I'm only one person and with your help, we can really spread the message of self love and sweat and change more lives all around the world. I'm Lunden Souza, reminding you that you deserve a life full of passion, presence and purpose, fueled by self-love and sweat. This podcast is a hit spot. Austria production.

Intro
Self-discovery and Mindset Shift
Motivation, Parenthood, and Pursuit
Balancing Training with Motherhood and Work
The Concept of the Magnificent Mom
Leaving a Lasting Legacy